We Are The Daughters of Mother Earth,the Yuka and the Ze
mi.Blessed by Grandfather Wei (Sun ) to from the womb of Atabei be born.
Welcome to our cyberspace enjoy the journey.Before you leave visit our pages,check out our links and sign in to follow us.As well visit our Cafe Press shop for original Taino designs in Tees and other beautiful items. Lastly we would love to hear from you.
Have an awesome moment.
Think native walk in balance

Sunday, May 3, 2009

3rd Indigenous Leaders Summit of the Americas

Please find below the ‘Plan of Action’ from the III Indigenous Leaders Summit of the Americas .
In English and Spanish, is the 3rd Indigenous Leaders Summit of the Americas Declaration, “Implementing the Rights of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas for Present and Future Generations”, Panama City, Panama.
This was presented by Indigenous leaders to the 5th Summit of the Americas on April 17 in Trinidad-Tobago.

[Forwarded by Grand Chief Ed John]
III Indigenous Leaders Summit of the Americas
PLAN OF ACTION
We, Indigenous Leaders of the Americas, gathered together on April 14-15, 2009, in Panama City, Panama, with the purpose of deliberating on a range of issues related to the work of the Organization of American States (OAS), and specifically the work to be conducted during the Fifth Summit of the Americas, do hereby call upon all States of the Americas to implement, in conjunction with Indigenous Peoples, the following Plan of Action:
Promoting Human Prosperity
1. Take effective measures to reduce the extreme impoverishment and social and economic marginalization of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas as an urgent priority of the Fifth Summit of the Americas Declaration of Commitment and Plan of Action.
2. Take effective measures to ensure protection against human rights violations related to child labour, forced conscription into armed conflict and trafficking, migration, forced displacement and forced relocation of Indigenous Peoples. (article 10 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN DRIP))
3. Facilitate, support, and promote the appropriate use and development of information and communications technologies (ICTs) by Indigenous Peoples to strengthen their legal, political, social, educational, cultural, spiritual and economic well-being, including Indigenous educational systems.
4. Take effective measures to support Indigenous Peoples’ efforts toward sustainable human development through environmentally responsible economic empowerment and trade.
5. Take effective measures to ensure the rights of Indigenous children and youth to a clean, healthy, sustainable and prosperous future, and to an adequate standard of life, to be able to maintain their cultures and traditions. (article 29 of the UNDRIP)
Intellectual and Cultural Property and Traditional Knowledge
6. The Intellectual Property, Traditional Knowledge, and Traditional Cultural Expressions of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas (which includes entire cultures, heritages, sports/traditional games, languages and peoples), must not be threatened or damaged through exploitation, appropriation, misappropriation, dispossession, or any other means of colonization. (article 31 of the UN DRIP)
Promoting Energy Security
7. Efforts to ensure energy security, that may impact the lands and territories of Indigenous Peoples, must be done in conjunction with Indigenous Peoples, and after obtaining their free, prior and informed consent, recognizing our close relationship with the natural world and the necessity to uphold the entirety of our rights, and also considering the devastating impacts of climate change as a result of fossil fuel development. (article 29 of the UN DRIP)
Free, Prior and Informed Consent
8. The free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples must be required when:
a) their inherent rights may be affected, particularly rights related to lands, water, resources (including sub-surface) and territories (article 26 of the UN DRIP); and/or
b) trade and development activities are being contemplated, including free trade agreements and extractive industry activities, involving transnational corporations in Indigenous Territories .
9. Respect and ensure Indigenous Peoples’ right to the conservation and protection of the environment, including its productive capacity (lands, territories, water, natural and genetic resources) and its biological diversity and ensure Indigenous Peoples’ access to sacred sites. (articles 11 and 29 of the UN DRIP)
Promoting Environmental Sustainability
10. States must take effective measures to support Indigenous Peoples’ efforts toward sustainable human development through environmentally responsible economic empowerment and trade, including the consideration of the devastating impact of climate change.
Strengthening Public Security
Crimes Against Humanity
11. States, and international criminal justice bodies are urged to establish appropriate and effective mechanisms to investigate, prosecute, punish and provide redress for crimes committed against Indigenous Peoples, including crimes of genocide, ethnocide, ecocide, crimes against humanity, rape as a weapon of war, the targeted physical elimination of Indigenous Leaders, the sterilization of Indigenous women against their will and the taking of Indigenous children from their homes and communities.
Voluntary Isolation
12. States must adopt adequate measures to recognize, restore and protect the lands, territories, environment and cultures of Indigenous Peoples in voluntary isolation or in initial contact.
Strengthening Democratic Governance and Strengthening the Summit of the Americas
13. States must fully uphold the principles of non-discrimination and equality in relation to Indigenous Peoples throughout the Americas . The proposed American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples must fully recognize the rights of Indigenous Peoples as Peoples with the right of self-determination without discrimination. This applies to Indigenous Peoples in non-self governing territories. (article 3 of the UN DRIP)
14. States must take effective measures to eradicate discrimination and violence against Indigenous Peoples, particularly Indigenous women and children. The full and effective participation of Indigenous women and youth must be ensured. (article 21 of the UN DRIP)
15. States must respect and uphold the principles of non-discrimination and equality in relation to Indigenous Peoples of the Americas as affirmed by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as Peoples equal to all other Peoples of the world.
The International Labour Organization Convention #169 (ILO Convention #169)
16. Member States of the Organization of American States who have ratified the International Labour Organization Convention #169 (ILO Convention #169) are urged to fully implement the Convention and we further urge those member States who have not yet ratified it to do the same. These efforts must be made with the full and effective participation of the Indigenous Peoples concerned.
Treaties and Agreements
17. States must honour, respect and uphold the Treaty rights of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas in accordance with their original spirit and intent as understood by Indigenous Peoples. Discriminatory legal doctrines and practices related to Treaties between Indigenous Peoples and States must be renounced by all member States of the Organization of American States. Effective corrective actions must be taken to cease the abrogation of Treaty rights, return and restore lands and resources which have been appropriated in violation of these Treaties, and ensure adequate enforcement of Treaty rights. (article 37 of the UN DRIP)
Follow-Up and Implementation Effectiveness
18. States are urged to initiate the establishment of a Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples within the Organization of American States with the full and effective participation of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas .






La III Cumbre de Líderes Indígenas de las Américas
“Implementando los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas de las Américas para las Generaciones Presentes y Futuras”
Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá
14 al 15 de abril del 2009

Nosotros, los Pueblos, Naciones y Organizaciones Indígenas de Sudamérica, Centroamérica y Norteamérica y el Caribe, presentamos esta Declaración con la visión de un futuro para los Pueblos Indígenas de todas las Américas en el que se respeten y cumplan cabalmente todos los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales. Los Pueblos Indígenas, incluyendo a las mujeres y los y las jóvenes, deben ser plena y efectivamente partícipes y socios en la implementación de estos derechos y libertades fundamentales.

Presentamos esta Declaración reconociendo que los Estados miembros de la OEA se reunirán del 17 al 19 de abril en el marco de la V Cumbre de las Américas en Trinidad y Tobago, que tiene como lema: “Asegurando el Futuro de Nuestros Ciudadanos mediante la Promoción de la Prosperidad humana, la Seguridad Energética y la Sostenibilidad Ambiental.”

Los derechos humanos, sociales, económicos y culturales de los Pueblos Indígenas son reconocidos en la Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas [“DDPI”], adoptada por la Asamblea general de las Naciones Unidas en septiembre del 2007. Asimismo, están afirmados estos derechos en muchos otros instrumentos internacionales a las que también están obligados los Estados miembros de la OEA, entre ellos: el Convenio169 de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo, la Convención sobre la Eliminación de todas las Formas de Discriminación Racial y su Recomendación General XXIII y el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales y el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos. También están afirmados estos derechos en tratados de nación a nación concluidos entre los Estados y los Pueblos Indígenas, de acuerdo con su intención original según lo entienden los Pueblos Indígenas. Por la presente, afirmamos estos derechos y declaramos que constituyen las normas mínimas que garanticen la supervivencia, la dignidad y el bienestar de los Pueblos Indígenas del mundo y, en particular, de las Américas.

La DDPI afirma que los Pueblos Indígenas en tanto Pueblos son iguales a todos los demás pueblos del mundo. Este principio imposibilita que los Estados recurran a sus sistemas jurídicos y políticos nacionales para negar el respeto y la protección de los derechos humanos de los Pueblos y las Naciones Indígenas. Este principio imposibilita asimismo la adopción de cualquier nuevo instrumento de derechos humanos que menoscabe los estándares establecidos en la DDPI de las Naciones Unidas.

Nuestros derechos deben ser reconocidos, respetados, protegidos, promovidos e implementados por los Pueblos Indígenas, la Organización de los Estados Americanos y sus miembros, y otras agencias e instituciones regionales, nacionales e internacionales. Éstos incluyen:

• La libre determinación como principio fundamental del que se derivan todos los demás derechos, incluyendo el reconocimiento de los sistemas de gobierno e instituciones indígenas, la historia oral y el derecho tradicional, los derechos relativos a las tierras, los recursos naturales y los territorios, el respeto y la protección de nuestros sitios culturales y ceremoniales sagrados, así como nuestros derechos de propiedad intelectual, cultural y de patrimonio.
• Los derechos sobre las tierras, los territorios y los recursos naturales que los Pueblos Indígenas tradicionalmente hemos poseído, utilizado, ocupado o adquirido de otra forma, incluyendo el derecho a preservar la integridad y la capacidad productiva de nuestras tierras, aguas, nuestros alimentos tradicionales de subsistencia y otros recursos esenciales para nuestra supervivencia;
• Los derechos civiles y políticos, incluyendo el derecho a la plena y efectiva participación en todos los espacios nacionales, regionales e internacionales, y el derecho a no ser objeto de crímenes contra la humanidad.
• Los derechos económicos, sociales y culturales, incluyendo el derecho a la seguridad alimentaria, a un nivel de vida, de salud y de educación adecuado, en particular el derecho a la educación en los idiomas indígenas;
• El derecho al consentimiento libre, previo e informado en todos los asuntos, entre ellos aquellos relativos al desarrollo que afecta nuestras tierras, nuestros territorios, nuestras aguas, nuestros recursos minerales y otros, y las medidas administrativas, legales y legislativas, tal como las medidas orientadas a enfrentar el cambio climático.
• El derecho a mantener, controlar, proteger y desarrollar conocimientos tradicionales, la propiedad intelectual y cultural, y a proteger y tener acceso a nuestros sitios sagrados; y
• El derecho a permanecer en aislamiento voluntario y a vivir libremente y de acuerdo a nuestras culturas.

Reafirmamos las declaraciones de las Cumbre de los Pueblos Indígenas de las Américas del 2001 y el 2005, incluyendo las Declaraciones de las Mujeres Indígenas y de los y las Jóvenes Indígenas del 2005. Reiteramos nuestro compromiso a trabajar juntos para fomentar los derechos de nuestros Pueblos para que algún día todos los Pueblos Indígenas de las Américas puedan vivir en paz y en seguridad, sin discriminación y en un ambiente saludable en todas las esferas de la vida, incluyendo nuestras relaciones espirituales, económicas, sociales, culturales y políticas entre nosotros mismos y con los miembros de la comunidad global.

La Organización de los Estados Americanos, todos los Estados miembros y otras agencias y/o instituciones regionales, nacionales e internacionales no deben fomentar los temas de la V Cumbre de las Américas en detrimento de los derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas de las Américas.

Finalmente, presentamos el Plan de Acción adjunto, basado en los temas del Proyecto de Declaración de Compromiso de los Estados: Promover la prosperidad humana; Promover la seguridad energética; Promover la sostenibilidad ambiental; Reforzar la seguridad pública; Reforzar la gobernabilidad democrática y Reforzar el seguimiento de la Cumbre de las Américas y la efectividad de la implementación.

No comments: